Drugs of Concern

Even though some substances are not currently controlled by the Controlled Substances Act, they pose risks to individuals who abuse them. The following section describes these drugs of concern and their associated risks. 

WHAT IS DXM? 

DXM is a cough suppressor found in more than 120 over-the-counter (OTC) cold medications, either alone or in combination with other drugs such as analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen), antihistamines (e.g., chlorpheni-ramine), decongestants (e.g., pseudoephedrine), and/ or expectorants (e.g., guaifenesin). The typical adult dose for cough is 15 or 30 mg taken three to four times daily. The cough-suppressing effects of DXM persist for 5 to 6 hours after ingestion. When taken as directed, side effects are rarely observed. 

WHAT IS ITS ORIGIN? 

DXM users can obtain the drug at almost any pharmacy or supermarket, seeking out the products with the high-est concentration of the drug from among all the OTC cough and cold remedies that contain it. DXM products and powder can also be purchased on the Internet. 

October 2, 2018

2018 National Drug Threat Assessment (NDTA)

The 2018 National Drug Threat Assessment (NDTA) is a comprehensive strategic assessment of the threat posed to the United States by domestic and international drug trafficking and the abuse of illicit drugs. The report combines federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement reporting; public health data; open source reporting; and intelligence from other government agencies to determine which substances and criminal organizations represent the greatest threat to the United States.

January 1, 2014

The Facts About DXM

DXM is a cough suppressant that is found in more than 100 over- the-counter (OTC) cold medications. It can be used alone, or in
combination with other drugs such as analgesics, antihistamines, decongestants, and/or expectorants.

May 1, 2017

Drug Slang Code Words

This Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Intelligence Report contains information from a variety of law enforcement and open sources. It is designed as a ready reference for law enforcement personnel who are confronted by many of the hundreds of slang terms used to identify a wide variety of controlled substances, designer drugs, and synthetic compounds. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information presented. However, due to the dynamics of the ever-changing drug scene, subsequent additions, deletions, and corrections are inevitable. Further addendums to this report will attempt to capture changed terminology, to the extent possible. This compendium of drug slang terms has been alphabetically ordered, and identifies drugs and drug categories in English and foreign language derivations.

June 15, 2017

Drugs of Abuse

Drugs of Abuse delivers clear, scientific information about drugs in a factual, straightforward way. With the information in this guide, parents and caregivers can help their children make smart choices and avoid the consequences of drug abuse. This publication covers topics including the Controlled Substances Act and introduces drug classes including narcotics, stimulants, marijuana/cannabis, inhalants, steroids, and more.  Drugs of Abuse also provides information about drugs of concern and designer drugs, including synthetic opioids and  “bath salts.”

Image of Salvia Divinorum

Salvia Divinorum

Psychoactive plant from the mint family, abused for its hallucinogenic effect.
Drug Type: Drugs of Concern
 
Kratom

Kratom

Leaves from the tropical tree Kratom in Southeast Asia which causes stimulant and sedative effects in different doses. More commonly abused in the Asia Pacific region than the...
Drug Type: Drugs of Concern
 
DEA US Badge
United States Drug Enforcement Administration DEA.gov is an official site of the U.S. Department of Justice