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Need to know more about drugs?  www.justthinktwice.com

GetSmart About Drugs - A DEA Resource for Parents

News Release [print friendly page]
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 21, 2002

NEW STUDY SHOWS INCREASE IN NUMBER
OF DRUG FREE SCHOOLS

Percentage of Teens Who Say Their School Is Drug Free 2000- 42, 2001-62Almost two-thirds of teens say their schools are drug-free, according to a new survey of teen drug use conducted by The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University. This is the first time in the seven-year history of the study that a majority of public school students report drug-free schools.

The same study for the year 2000 found that only 42 percent of the 12-17 year olds in public schools reported that their schools were drug-free. In this year's study, the figure rose to 62 percent.

"This is a very encouraging sign that progress is being made in the fight against drugs," said Asa Hutchinson, Director of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. "The majority of teens do not want to use drugs. We at the DEA are committed to making sure that they never have to face drugs in their neighborhoods or schools."

The survey raises an important point, said Mr. Hutchinson. "Parents have it within their power to persuade school administrators and teachers that keeping drugs out of school is every bit as important to the future of their children as academics or extracurricular activities. You can't become a well-educated, productive citizen if drugs are destroying your intellect and your character."

 

For more information about the study visit www.casacolumbia.org

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