Drug Enforcement Administration
Skip Navigation

Press Room
News Releases
E-mail updates red envelope
Speeches & Testimony
Multi-Media Library

About Us
Mission
Leadership
History
Organizational Chart
Programs & Operations
Wall of Honor
DEA Museum
Office Locations

Careers at DEA

DEA Drug Information
Drug Information Resources

Law Enforcement
Most Wanted
Major Operations
Threat Assessment
Training Programs
Stats & Facts
Additional Resources

Drug Prevention
For Young Adults
For Parents
Additional Drug Resources

Diversion Control & Prescription Drugs
Registration
Cases Against Doctors

Drug Policy
Controlled Substances Act
Federal Trafficking Penalties
Drug Scheduling

Legislative Resources

Publications

Acquisitions & Contracts

Need to know more about drugs?  www.justthinktwice.com

GetSmart About Drugs - A DEA Resource for Parents

News Release [print friendly page]
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 9, 2003

Arrests Reveal Increased Colombian Presence in Mexico's Drug Industry

CocaineMAY 9--An article in today's Washington Post discusses recent reports by Mexican and U.S. officials of increasing numbers of Colombian traffickers coming to Mexico. The Colombian traffickers are working to reestablish connections disrupted by the Mexican government's arrests of the country's most powerful drug barons. Those arrests have caused chaos in cocaine trafficking networks from the U.S. border to laboratories in South American jungles and have drawn powerful Colombian traffickers to Mexico to make sure supply routes stay open.

Roger Guevara, Chief of Operations at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, said the DEA has noticed the increased Colombian presence in Mexico. He said that because of President Vicente Fox's successful disruption of drug cartels from Tijuana to the Gulf of Mexico, "the Colombians have been forced to establish new contacts in Mexico to oversee the importation of illicit drug shipments to the United States." Michael S. Vigil said, "The Colombians are the masters of the universe in terms of violence and intimidation, and they have educated the Mexicans very well."

 

Home USDOJ.GOV Privacy Policy Contact Us Site Map