Micrograms

Microgram Bulletin LE is a law-enforcement restricted newsletter published monthly by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's Office of Forensic Sciences.  Microgram Bulletin was a non-restricted version of Microgram Bulletin LE, that was published from January, 2003 through December, 2013*.  Microgram Bulletin LE is primarily intended to assist and serve forensic scientists concerned with the detection and analyses of suspected controlled substances for forensic/law enforcement purposes.  It features Intelligence Alerts, Intelligence Briefs, and Selective Literature References, and may also include Drug Scheduling Actions or Updates, Safety Alerts, Meeting Announcements, Employment Opportunities, Journal and Textbook Collection Exchange Offers, and Training Opportunities.

Microgram Journal is a periodical published by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's Office of Forensic Sciences, and presents peer reviewed, full length Scientific Research Articles and Technical Notes on the detection and analyses of suspected controlled substances for forensic/law enforcement purposes.  Articles of interest are accepted both from within and outside of DEA, and reviewers are both internal (from within DEA) and external.

Microgram Postings
  • Microgram Bulletin LE is currently posted at https://www.cjis.gov/ in the DEA Special Interest Group (SIG), and the Department of Justice’s information exchange website (IDEA).  

*NOTE: Microgram Bulletin was returned to restricted status on January 1, 2014; the December, 2013 issue is the last non-restricted issue.

To contact the Microgram Editor:

via email (mail to): DEA-Microgram@usdoj.gov

by postal service: Microgram Editor
Drug Enforcement Administration
Special Testing and Research Laboratory
22624 Dulles Summit Court
Dulles, VA  20166

General Information

Microgram Journal is a periodical published by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's Office of Forensic Sciences, and presents peer reviewed, full length Scientific Research Articles and Technical Notes on the detection and analyses of suspected controlled and/or abused substances for forensic/law enforcement purposes.

Submissions to Microgram Journal

Manuscripts are accepted both from within and outside of DEA, and reviewers are both internal (from within the DEA laboratory system) and external. All submissions must be in English. All submissions should, whenever possible, be submitted electronically, as straight email or as a PC-compatible Microsoft Word® attachment, to: DEA-Microgram -at- usdoj.gov. Current versions of Microsoft Word® (defined as having release dates less than 5 years old) should be utilized. If electronic (email) submission is not possible, submissions may be mailed to: Microgram Editor, Drug Enforcement Administration, Special Testing and Research Laboratory, 22624 Dulles Summit Court, Dulles, VA  20166. Hard-copy manuscripts should be submitted in triplicate, and should also be accompanied by an electronic version (written in Microsoft Word®) on a PC-compatible CD. Note that diskettes should be mailed in an irradiation-proof protective sleeve, and the mailing envelope should be marked: “Warning - Contains Electronic Media”. Hard-copy manuscripts should be printed in black ink using a laser or ink jet printer, double-spaced and single-sided on 8 1/2" x 11" or A4 high quality white bond paper. A Times New Roman/12-point font is preferred for all submissions (electronic or hard copy). Each page, including tables, photos, and figures, should have a one-inch (25 mm) margin on all sides. All photos and figures should also be submitted as stand-alone attachments, not only embedded in the manuscript. The pages should be numbered, but not stapled together.

Note that mailed submissions may be subject to lengthy handling delays beyond the control of the Office of Forensic Sciences, and electronic media sent through the mail may be destroyed en route by sanitizing procedures, despite protective measures and written warnings. For these reasons, submissions should be made electronically unless impossible.  All submissions should include the following Contact Information: The Full Name and Address of Submitting Laboratory or Office, and the Full Name, Phone Number, FAX Number, and Preferred email address of the Submitting Individual.

Scientific Research Articles are formal, full length reports detailing original research in the detection and analysis of suspected controlled and/or abused substances for forensic/law enforcement purposes, excluding in post-ingestion human/animal biological matrices (blood, urine, meconium, sweat, hair, saliva, fingernails, etc.) Technical Notes are shorter communications concentrating on a specific drug (or drug class), unusual case, novel or unusual procedure or method, or minor original research, again excluding in post-ingestion human/animal biological matrices. Each article/note should be a “stand-alone” work; multi-part, serial publications will not be considered. Similarly, articles/notes which essentially duplicate existing literature will not be considered unless the presented data reflect significant advances in instrumentation made since the original publication(s) (however, see: Dual Publications, below). All submissions will be subjected to peer review, and authors will be notified of the results of the review(s) within three months after the manuscript is received by the Editor.

The following guidelines should be used for all Articles (Technical Notes may follow an abbreviated version as appropriate):

Cover Letter - Provide the standard contact information and pertinent correspondence (if any) for the Editor.

Title - Should be specific and amenable to indexing; they should not include acronyms or abbreviations except for very common instrumental technique acronyms (e.g., GC/MS or HPLC) and/or very common drug acronyms (e.g., MDMA or PCP). Titles should be sufficiently informative that the readership should not have to read the Abstract or the Introduction to understand the focus of the article. If the manuscript reflects work previously presented at a scientific meeting, a statement detailing that presentation should be included as a footnote to the Title.

Author(s)/Affiliation(s) - The author's full name (including middle initial(s)) and title, and the full name and address of the laboratory or office should immediately follow the title. The author’s degree level may be included if desired, but is not required (however, multiple authors should all include or all exclude this information). If there are several authors from two or more laboratories or offices, each set of authors should be listed separately, followed by their corresponding laboratory name and address (that is, Authors I, Laboratory I, Authors II, Laboratory II, etc.). Excessive authorship should be avoided. If there is more than one author, the primary author should be indicated with a superscripted asterisk. The name, phone numbers (Voice and FAX), preferred email address, and (if different from the laboratory or office address) the full mailing address of the contact person should be included on the title page.

Abstract - State the purpose, procedures, and principal findings of the paper, in 120 words or less. Avoid the use of abbreviations, and use only common acronyms as defined under “Titles.” Note that the abstract will be provided to Chemical Abstracts.

Keyword List - A minimum of five (maximum ten) abstracting keywords should be included. Unless inappropriate, the last keyword pair should always be “Forensic Chemistry.”

Introduction - Briefly state the issue or problem. Detail existing practice in the topic area, and explain the shortcomings (if any) in what has been previously reported and/or what is being currently done in the field; that is, compare and contrast the selected methodology with previous and/or existing methods. Provide theoretical and practical background for novel or rarely utilized experimental or instrumental methods. The Introduction should include the results of a “reasonably comprehensive” literature search, and pertinent references cited (avoid “Personal Communications”).

Experimental (Chemicals, Instrumentation, Procedures) - Detail the chemicals, instruments, and procedures utilized (including experimental parameters). However, use caution in detailing syntheses of controlled or abused substances, especially novel syntheses to known controlled substances, or syntheses of novel substances that may be subject to abuse, that are not yet well known in the scientific and/or underground literature. [In such cases, a simple statement should be included to the effect that: “Experimental details on this synthesis are not provided, in accordance with Journal policy.”]

Results and Discussion - Present findings in a logical, easily followed sequence. Describe what was done, and where appropriate what conclusions can be drawn. Pertinent references should be included.  Compare and contrast the findings with previous studies and/or current practice. Discuss any problems and/or unresolved issues.

Conclusions - Optional - Summarized results should be included only for complex articles. Conclusions should not merely duplicate the Abstract or the summary paragraph in the Results and Discussion section.

Acknowledgments - Optional - Should be brief, and include the full name, affiliation, and specific contribution made by each cited individual.

References - Articles and notes should have all textual citations collected in an endnotes list. Within the text, references should be consecutively numbered with superscripted Arabic numerals, or with Arabic numerals in brackets, in accordance with their first appearance (either format is acceptable). Within the endnotes list, references should be consecutively numbered with Arabic numerals, as follows: Number, Period, Indent, Citation. Reference format should adhere to the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals (Note: This is the same reference format utilized in the Selected Reference Citations in Microgram Bulletin, Microgram Bulletin LE, and by the Journal of Forensic Sciences). Due to their inherently transitory nature, use of website URL’s as references are discouraged but are permitted; when a website is used, the “date of last access” should follow the citation. As previously noted, “Personal Communications” should not be utilized; however, if unavoidable, utilize the following format: Full Name, Title, Affiliation (Laboratory or Office), Location (City and State, plus Nation if not the United States), Personal Communication, Year.

Table and Figures - All Tables and Figures should be appended onto the end of the article (not embedded in the text). Tables and Figures should be consecutively numbered with Arabic numerals, in accordance with their first citation in the text. Each Table and Figure should be “stand-alone”; that is, include sufficient descriptive information such that the reader will not have to refer back to the text to understand the Table or Figure. The Header should include the Table or Figure number and a concise title. Explanatory material, definitions of acronyms and/or abbreviations, and/or references within the Table or Figure should be designated by superscripted, lower case letters in alphabetical order, and included in dedicated footnotes at the bottom of the respective Table or Figure. Unless color is needed to enhance differentiation of the depicted material, all Tables and Figures should be in black and white (that is, avoid frivolous use of color for “artistic” purposes). Figures of spectra, chromatograms, charts, graphs, etc., should have clear and legibly labeled axes, but should not include instrument generated printoffs of experimental parameter lists.

Manuscripts submitted to Microgram Journal are required to be finished, professional quality efforts. Authors should ensure clarity, brevity, and pertinence of the presented information. Attention to detail in formatting, syntax, grammar, and spelling are as important as the accuracy of the facts presented. At the Editor’s discretion, clearly substandard and/or inappropriate manuscripts will be returned to the authors without review.

Manuscripts will not be retyped, but “final” versions are subject to minor to moderate Editorial rewrite to improve presentation clarity or to reformat to current Microgram Journal style.

Dual publication - Re-publication of articles or notes of presumed interest to the Microgram Journal readership will be considered if the article was originally published in a journal that is not easily accessed and the primary author has obtained explicit, written copyright exclusion from the original publisher and consent from all co-authors. Examples include exact English translations of articles or notes originally published in a non-English language journal, non-sensitive articles or notes originally published in a restricted journal or on a password protected website, or articles or notes originally published in limited distribution newsletters or proceedings. In general, any article or note that was published in English in a mainstream journal is not a candidate for re-publication in Microgram Journal. Authors interested in re-publishing previously published articles or notes in Microgram Journal should discuss the issue with the Editor before submitting.
Note that (in accordance with standard ethical guidelines) re-published articles should not be included as “new” articles in the respective author(s)’ Curriculum Vitae.

Costs - There are no costs (to the contributor) associated with publication in Microgram Journal.

Reprints - Microgram Journal does not provide reprints to authors. Microgram Journal may be photocopied (or printed off the website) as needed.

Questions may be directed to the Editor.

General Information

Microgram Bulletin LE is a monthly newsletter published by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's Office of Forensic Sciences, and presents information of interest to forensic scientists concerned with the detection and analyses of suspected controlled and/or abused substances for forensic/law enforcement purposes. The information includes primarily Intelligence Alerts and Selective Literature References, and also (but infrequently) includes Drug Scheduling Updates, Safety Alerts, Selected Intelligence Briefs, Meeting Announcements, Employment Opportunities, Journal and Textbook Collection Exchange offers, and select Training Opportunities. Explanatory details for most of the above types of submission are detailed below, and typical examples of Intelligence Alerts may be found in any recent issue of Microgram Bulletin LE.

Submissions to Microgram Bulletin LE

Submissions are accepted both from within and outside of DEA.  All submissions must be in English. All submissions should, whenever possible, be submitted electronically, as straight email or as a PC-compatible Microsoft Word® attachment, to: DEA-Microgram -at- usdoj.gov. Current versions of Microsoft Word® (defined as having release dates less than 5 years old) should be utilized. If electronic (email) submission is not possible, submissions may be mailed to: Microgram Editor, Drug Enforcement Administration, Special Testing and Research Laboratory, 22624 Dulles Summit Court, Dulles, VA  20166. Mailed submissions should include both a hard-copy and an electronic version (written in Microsoft Word®) on a PC-compatible CD. Note that diskettes should be mailed in an irradiation-proof protective sleeve, and the mailing envelope should be marked: “Warning - Contains Electronic Media”. All photos and figures should also be submitted as stand-alone attachments, not embedded in the writeup.
Note that mailed submissions may be subject to lengthy handling delays beyond the control of the Office of Forensic Sciences, and electronic media sent through the mail may be destroyed en route by sanitizing procedures, despite protective measures and written warnings. For these reasons, submissions should be made electronically unless impossible.  All submissions should include the following Contact Information: The Full Name and Address of Submitting Laboratory or Office, and the Full Name, Phone Number, and Preferred email address of the Submitting Individual.
The following guidelines should be followed:

Intelligence Alerts are concise synopses of the physical and chemical characterization of novel and/or interesting exhibits submitted to law enforcement laboratories involved in the detection and analyses of suspected controlled and/or abused substances for forensic/law enforcement purposes. Submissions should have some unusual aspect, such as a novel drug, an atypical formulation, or a new smuggling technique, as opposed to routine analyses (that is, that confirmed what was suspected/expected).

Important Preface:  Although Microgram Bulletin LE distribution is (currently) Law Enforcement Restricted, the submitting laboratory should ensure that sensitive intelligence information is not included in submitted Alerts.  It should be assumed that any/every issue of Microgram Bulletin LE will eventually be public access, whether by official action, error, improper release by a subscriber, or hacking.  “Eventually” may mean six decades, six years, or six weeks.  For this reason, due diligence should be exercised in preparing submissions.  However, the provided information should be sufficient such that the final product is useful to law enforcement personnel and forensic scientists – Alerts with minimal detail are of little or no value to the readership, and should be avoided.
The following standard information should be included in an Alert writeup:

1) Formal name of the submitting laboratory.

2) Location of the laboratory (city and state – or if non-U.S., city and country).

3) Basic physical description of the exhibit(s):  Numbers, forms, colors, dimensions, logos, odor, packaging, mass, etc.  Unusual aspects, if any, should be well described.  Include illustrative photo(s) if possible, as .jpg attachments of reasonable size (i.e., less than 500 kb each); photos should not be embedded in the text document, and should include a ruler or some other means of estimating scale (such as a U.S. coin).

4) Suspected identity of each exhibit (if based on field testing, whether chemical or instrumental, so state).  If submitted as an unknown, so state.

5) Location of seizure (city and state – or if non-U.S., city and country).  If the location was obscure, provide a more recognizable reference point (e.g., approximately XX miles northeast of major city, state).

6) If known and non-sensitive, the generic circumstances of the seizure; e.g., pursuant to a traffic stop, at a “rave,” at a parcel/mail facility, from an arriving passenger, at a storage facility, by purchase, etc.  If the circumstances are “unknown” or are “sensitive,” so state in order to preclude triggering followup questions.

7) Name of the agency making the seizure.

8) Methods used for the analysis of the exhibit(s); standard acronyms are acceptable (e.g., GC/FID, GC/MS, FTIR/ATR, etc.)

9) Results of analysis, including identification of all controlled or abused substances, quantitation value(s) if determined, and major adulterants/diluents if determined.  In order to avoid ambiguity, if uncommon controlled substances are identified, the description should use the full chemical name(s) of the identified substances (if desired, acronyms or street terminology (e.g., “Foxy-Methoxy", “Nexus”, or “STP”) can be included in parentheses after the full chemical name).  If the controlled or abused substance(s) were not formally quantitated, a rough estimate of the loading (trace, low, moderate, or high) based on the GC, TIC, LC, IR, NMR, UV or any other appropriate technique should be provided, and the approximate ratios of controlled substances and (if determined) major adulterants should be provided.  If adulterants and/or diluents were above trace level but not identified, so state in order to preclude triggering followup questions.

10) The Alert should conclude with a statement as to whether other submissions similar to the described exhibit(s) have never / rarely / occasionally / (or) commonly been received by the submitting laboratory.

Submitting laboratories are also welcome to provide a suggested title and (for unusual submissions) editorial or speculative comments; these may or may not be included in the final writeup.  Edited/draft write-ups will be returned to the submitting laboratory for review and approval before incorporation into Microgram Bulletin LE.

Selected Literature References is a monthly compilation of reference citations of presumed interest to forensic chemists, derived from thousands of scientific and technical periodicals. The focus of the Selected Literature References is the detection and analysis of suspected controlled and/or abused substances for forensic/law enforcement purposes. References from clinical and toxicological journals are included only if the material is judged to be of high interest to forensic chemists (for example, contains the mass spectra of an unusual substance that is not known to be published elsewhere). Note that citations from obscure periodicals may be missed, and all subscribers are invited to submit citations of interest if they do not appear in Microgram Bulletin LE within three months of their publication. Of particular interest are articles from regional forensic science association newsletters that are unlikely to be noted by any abstracting service. Citations should include a summary sentence and the primary author’s contact information.

Safety Alerts are urgent communiqués to the readership which give notice of a specific safety issue of particular interest to forensic laboratory personnel, or to law enforcement personnel dealing with controlled and/or abused substances. They should include a concise synopsis of the incident(s), recommendations (if any), pertinent literature citations (if any are known), and a mechanism for providing feedback (if appropriate).

Meeting Announcements list upcoming meetings of presumed interest to the readership. In general, only meetings which are dedicated to forensic chemistry/forensic drug analysis or include a subsection so dedicated will be publicized.  Meeting Announcements should include the Formal Title, Sponsoring Organization, Date Range, Location (City, State, and specific locale), Registration Deadline, Recommended Hotel (include details on special rates and deadlines where applicable), and Contact Individual’s Name, Phone Number, and email Address. If attendance is restricted, the restrictions should be specified.  If available, the URL for the meeting website should also be included in the Announcement.

Employment Opportunities lists job announcements of presumed interest to the readership. In general, only jobs with a forensic chemistry/forensic drug analysis focus for Federal, State, or Local Crime Laboratories or Offices will be publicized.  Exceptions may be requested and will be considered on a case-by-case basis (for example, an academic position in a Forensic Chemistry Department). Employment Opportunity announcements should include the Formal Title of the Organization, Formal Title of the Laboratory or Office, Position Title, Laboratory or Office Location (City and State), Salary Range, Opening and Closing Dates, Duties, General Requirements, Specialized Requirements (if any), Application Procedures, and the Contact Individual’s Name, Phone Number, email Address, and Mailing Address. If available, the URL for the agency’s website, and (if available) the specific URL for the job posting should also be included in the Announcement. Employment Opportunities will typically be posted for 3 consecutive months, but not past the application deadline.

The Journal/Textbook Collection Exchange - If any subscriber is interested in donating any forensic or analytical chemistry journal and/or textbook collection to a fellow subscriber or library, the Office of Forensic Sciences is willing to list the offered materials and the associated contact information in a future issue. The general format should follow the example in the January 2003 issue, and should be sent via email to the Microgram Editor at: DEA-Microgram -at- usdoj.gov. Only items for donation (not for sale) will be considered for publication, and donations to libraries should adhere to journal restrictions and/or time limits (if any) on such offers.  Offerings will typically be posted for 3 consecutive months.

Selected Intelligence Briefs are reprinted (with permission) unclassified intelligence briefs of presumed interest to the readership that have been previously published in restricted or non-restricted publications or websites that are also dedicated to the detection and analyses of suspected controlled and/or abused substances for forensic/law enforcement purposes. Selected Intelligence Briefs must be unclassified, and should be a minimum of 1 page and a maximum of 10 pages in length (single spaced at 11 pitch Times New Roman font, including photos, tables, charts, etc.). All subscribers are invited to submit such material, which must include the author’s and publisher’s contact information.

I) To Volunteer to be a Reviewer for Microgram Journal

II) General Instructions

III) Ethical Guidelines

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I) To Volunteer to be a Reviewer for Microgram Journal

Qualified reviewers are needed for Microgram Journal, and volunteers are requested from the forensic/analytical communities. Volunteers should provide the following information to the Microgram Editor at the email or mailing addresses detailed below:

  • Full Name and Title.
  • Office or Laboratory Name and Mailing Address.
  • Personal email Address (if none, so state).
  • Brief Summary of Experience (education level; number of years working in the field; number of articles published; previous reviewing experience (yes/no); etc.).
  • Topics the Volunteer is Qualified to Review (e.g., "All", "Instrumentation", "Botanicals","Clandestine Laboratories", "Safety", "Microscopy", etc.).

Addresses:

via email (email to): DEA-Microgram@usdoj.gov

by postal service (mail to): Microgram Editor
Drug Enforcement Administration
Special Testing and Research Laboratory
22624 Dulles Summit Court
Dulles, VA  20166

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II) General Instructions

One of the primary goals of Microgram Journal is timely publication of quality manuscripts. In order to meet this goal, expeditious handling by both the Editor and the reviewers is required. In general, all manuscripts will be first subjected to an quick pre-review by the Editor in order to cull out submissions that either have inappropriate subject matter or otherwise do not meet the minimum standards for consideration. Following this editorial pre-review, wherever possible, manuscripts will be electronically forwarded to two reviewers (i.e., as attachments to emails). The reviewers will be selected based on their self-stated area(s) of expertise. Hard copy submissions - which should be rare - will be converted to .pdf format in order to facilitate rapid electronic redistribution to reviewers. The target goal for reviewers for turnaround is three weeks from the date of receipt; however, extended turnaround times will be specified for longer and/or more complex submissions, and will also be considered upon request by reviewers. In order to avoid extended delays due to reviewers not being present at their offices, reviewers should send a "Receipt Acknowledged" email to the Editor upon receipt of a manuscript for review.  If no response is received within five business days, it will be assumed that the reviewer is out of their office or otherwise unavailable, and the manuscript will be forwarded to another reviewer. In such cases, the original (non-responding) reviewer will receive a second email informing them of the change, and relieving them of the responsibility of performing the requested review.

When conducting the review, the reviewer should be mindful that their primary goal is the enhancement of the manuscript's quality. The reviewer should objectively judge the organizational layout, the presented work, and the derived conclusions, and make suggestions where appropriate. In general, reviews can take one of two forms. If the write-up is essentially acceptable, needing only minor changes and/or "editorial" corrections of various typos, sentence structure, grammar, etc., those changes can be directly annotated on a hard copy of the manuscript (Note: Written annotations must be clear and legible!) However, if the write-up will require moderate to extensive rewriting, or moderate to extensive additional work, then the reviewer should type up a formal response which details the issues needing clarification, correction, and/or expansion. In the latter cases, the reviewer should not also perform the "editorial" markups, since many of those corrections will likely be rendered moot in the revision, and also to avoid overwhelming the principal issues with a host of minor corrections (however, general observations such as "The reference format is incorrect", "The manuscript should be double spaced", or "There are a large number of typos in the text" are acceptable and encouraged).

Typed responses from reviewers should clearly explain and support their judgments and suggestions, so that both the Editor and the authors can understand and act on them. Where appropriate, references to previously published work that is germane to the review should be cited in support of the reviewers' comments. However, unsupportable assertions should be avoided, and the intellectual independence of the author(s) should be respected.

Typed responses should be emailed to the Editor (but not to the authors!) Annotated manuscripts should be converted to .pdf format and emailed to the Editor as an attachment to an email.
The following list specifying the degree of acceptance/rejection should be used by the reviewer:

  • Accept As Is.
  • Accept With Minor Corrections As Noted.
  • Return to the Authors for Minor Changes.
  • Return to the Authors for Moderate Changes.
  • Willing to Do a Secondary Review?: Yes No
  • Return to the Authors for Major Changes.
  • Willing to Do a Secondary Review?: Yes No
  • Reject

In addition, as noted above, if the reviewer has selected a "Return to Authors for Moderate/Major Changes" option, they should also specify whether they would be willing to conduct a secondary review if/when the authors submit a revised manuscript.

Finally, if the reviewer feels that a submission would be more appropriately published in a different journal, they should so indicate, specifying the suggested journal(s).

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III) Ethical Guidelines

All manuscripts are confidential documents, and must be kept secure and private by the reviewer. Printoffs (and/or photocopies) should not be made except for purposes of the review itself (NOTE: If the reviewer has indicated a willingness to conduct a secondary review, they may retain a copy of their annotated copy of the manuscript for their future reference; otherwise, all electronic and/or hard copies should be destroyed upon completion of the review). If the reviewer feels that the topic is outside their area of expertise, or if they cannot complete the review in a timely fashion, or if they feel they have either a personal or professional conflict of interest that could possibly influence their impartiality and objectivity, they should discontinue the review and immediately notify the Editor. Manuscripts should be judged based on their relative merits alone, without regard to authorship or the country or professional affiliation of the author(s). Criticism (even harsh criticism) of the quality of the work and/or write-up is acceptable where merited; however, personal criticism of an author or authors is inappropriate, and must be avoided. Finally, if the reviewer is aware that the manuscript is essentially a duplicate of previously published or currently co-submitted work by the authors, or is highly similar to previously published work by different authors, they should immediately bring that fact to the attention of the Editor.

Questions should be directed to the Editor.

All issues of Microgram (November 1967 - March 2002), the first nine issues of its successor Microgram Bulletin (April - December, 2002), and all issues of Microgram Bulletin LE are Law Enforcement Restricted publications, and are therefore unavailable to the public.  Past issues or select sections of issues (e.g., specific Intelligence Alerts or Articles) are available only to law enforcement affiliated offices and laboratories. 

Requests from such offices and laboratories must be made on official letterhead, must include a justification of why it is needed, and must be mailed to:

Deputy Assistant Administrator
Office of Forensic Sciences
Drug Enforcement Administration
8701 Morrissette Drive
Springfield, VA  22152

Note that requests made via email, via emailed attachments, or via other electronic media will not be honored.  Note also that the referenced archives are not available via FOIA requests.

To subscribe or to change your subscription preferences, please click on E-mail updates. Enter your email address and follow the easy instructions. You will be notified by email when a new issue of Microgram is posted. The email message will include a hyperlink to the appropriate web page. The publications are not sent as attachments.

Access to Microgram Bulletin, Microgram Bulletin LE, and Microgram Journal is free.

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